Author Topic: Interesting fundraiser for Ragdoll Research  (Read 618 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Rebecca

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 467
  • Thanked: 45 times
  • Every day is a new start
  • About me: Owned by a Ragdoll
Interesting fundraiser for Ragdoll Research
« on: March 09, 2019, 04:41:55 pm »
This fundraiser came to my attention because I am friends with a few breeders. I had never heard of these problems.  This missing/one  kidney issue does concern me as a pet owner.
I am glad that breeders are caring enough to want to find out what is happening to our favourite breed.



https://www.gofundme.com/ragdollsoneuterinehorn?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=fb_dn_cpgnstaticsmall_r

GENETIC RESEARCH IN RAGDOLLS - ONE UTERINE HORN/ONE KIDNEY PROJECT

 
Even though breeders strive to breed only healthy animals, unfortunately issues do happen.
This fundraiser has been created to help fund a genetic research that can help keep our wonderful Ragdolls healthy. 

The first project we are fundraising for is one uterine horn/one kidney issue that has been happening in Ragdolls for several years. It will be conducted by Dr. Leslie Lyons and Dr. Susan Little. As soon as we raise the first $5000, Dr Lyons will be able to start analysing the DNA samples she has already received.

For several years Ragdoll breeders have reported cases of female cats missing a uterine horn and also the kidney on the same side. Male cats have been reported missing a kidney.

It is important to note that in almost all cases, females have both ovaries. There have been cases reported where a second spay surgery had to be performed to locate and remove the second ovary.

This defect may be called various names, such as uterus unicornis, uterine horn aplasia, uterine horn hypoplasia and renal agenesis.

This project will help to determine if and how this issue, which can happen in other breeds and domestic cats, is inherited in Ragdolls. We are hoping that the research will help develop a test to determine which cats carry the gene responsible for this issue so that we can eliminate this problem.

If you are a Ragdoll breeder who had this issue please contact Dr Lyons directly and please send DNA samples of both affected cat/kitten and itís normal relatives so they can be inculded in this research. Please include an x-ray or a vet report if available that confirms the condition and send it to:

Leslie A. Lyons, PhD
Gilbreath-McLorn Endowed Professor of Comparative Medicine
Department of Veterinary Medicine & Surgery
College of Veterinary Medicine
E109 Vet Med Building, 1600 E. Rollins St.
University of Missouri - Columbia
Columbia, MO 65211
Lyonsla@Missouri.edu Phone: 01 573 882 9777
Website: felinegenetics.missouri.edu
Lab: 01 573 884 2287 Lab e-mail: felinegenome@missouri.edu
Professor Emerita - University of California - Davis




Another project that we are talking to Dr. Leslie Lyons about, and talking about repeating it, is genetic diversity* in Ragdolls. Genetic diversity project in Ragdolls was last done 15 years ago and it may no longer be relevant. There are several issues happening in the breed that could possibly be attributed to the inbreeding depression**.


To better understand why genetic diversity is very important for any species, please see articles written by Carol Beuchat, PhD:
http://www.instituteofcaninebiology.org/the-elevator-pitch.html

http://www.instituteofcaninebiology.org/whats-in-the-gene-pool.html


*Genetic diversity is the total number of genetic characteristics in the genetic makeup of a species. It is distinguished from genetic variability, which describes the tendency of genetic characteristics to vary. Genetic diversity serves as a way for populations to adapt to changing environments.

**Inbreeding depression is the reduced biological fitness in a given population as a result of inbreeding, or breeding of related individuals. Population biological fitness refers to an organism's ability to survive and perpetuate its genetic material. Inbreeding depression is often the result of a population bottleneck.
  • Freyr, Freya, Rune, MonAmi, and Blaise
 
The following users thanked this post: Desi, HelenMac, Ragsmomma

Offline HelenMac

Re: Interesting fundraiser for Ragdoll Research
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2019, 01:33:55 am »
Very Interesting. After having lost my Tigga to kidney failure😭 I'm so glad there's going to be more research done. Hopefully then these kidney diseases can be eradicated.
  • Shadow and Zimba
 

Ragdoll Cats United!

Re: Interesting fundraiser for Ragdoll Research
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2019, 01:33:55 am »
Your Ad Here

Offline Codysmom

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 455
  • Thanked: 46 times
  • Mum to Cody, Fozzy, Katy & Mittens!
  • About me: Owned by a Ragdoll
Re: Interesting fundraiser for Ragdoll Research
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2019, 07:38:43 am »
Our Fluffy only had one kidney and it was smaller than normal, she died too soon due to kidney failure and I still miss her terribly.  Although she was a rescue it's good to know they're researching it.
  • 3 Raggies, 1 moggie (Ragdoll wannabee) and a mini doxie!
 

Tags: genetic research